When utilizing the aircraft hydraulic system for many flight pertinent operations, it is critical that there is something in place to ensure that sufficient power is provided for actuation and surges in pressure are mitigated. With aircraft accumulators, the aircraft hydraulic system can operate safely and efficiently, accommodating for varying needs. The main functions of an aircraft accumulator include mitigating pressure surges within the hydraulic system, storing power for when pumps fail to operate, compensation for internal or external leaking, as well as power pump aid for extra force. Across aircraft that have hydraulic systems, there are often also multiple accumulators present in the main system, as well as within varying subsystems.


Read more »


An unmounted bearing refers to any bearing that does not require a housing block, mounting flange, or other mounting mechanism to attach to a drive shaft. Plain bearings are the simplest type of this bearing, consisting merely of a bearing surface and no rolling elements. In operation, the journal (section of a shaft in contact with a bearing) slides directly over the bearing surface. Generally speaking, plain bearings are the least expensive type of bearing. Despite their compact and lightweight nature, they have a high load-carrying capacity, making them popular for many applications.


Read more »


In the realm of aviation, fires are a very rare occurrence. With highly advanced systems and intense testing of the aircraft engine and components, most fires are preventable altogether. Nevertheless, it is still always a possibility for accidents or malfunctions to happen, whether caused by the spilling of oil or a leakage. Because of this, aircraft feature a robust fire protection system to detect aircraft engine fires as soon as they occur. Two of the most common means of fire protection is the spot detector and continuous loop system, each containing their own types. In this article, we will discuss the fire detector systems present in aircraft, and how each function.


Read more »


For an aircraft to achieve sustained flight, it requires some form of thrust. This can be achieved by propulsion systems, and various aircraft may have different systems to achieve this common goal. The aircraft turbine engine is a form of propulsion system that serves a wide variety of aircraft and utilizes gas to produce thrust. While there are different types of aircraft gas turbine engines, each type shares some common aerospace components that define their engine family and provide for their functionality. In this blog, we will provide an overview of the various common gas turbine engines and how they benefit the aircraft they are installed on.


Read more »


A jet engine on an average commercial airliner weighs approximately 1,600 lbs. An entire commercial wing itself weighs in at about 95,000 lbs. So how do you attach an extra 2,000 lbs. of engine onto an already 100,000 lb wing structure and keep it from falling off? But wait, we forgot to factor in the present gravitational force pushing and pulling this 2,000 lb engine down and away from the wing during take-off. Point being, engineers overcome an enormous obstacle in attaching a jet engine underneath a wing (that sticks out 150 feet from its central airframe) and takes off against immense gravitational pull. In this article, we will give all praise due to aircraft pylons and engine mounts, the aircraft parts responsible for such an “achievement of attachment”.


Read more »


Aircraft landing gear systems are one of the most instrumental subsystems of an aircraft.  The detailed design of a landing gear system makes its product development cycle time a long and critical process. The end result must meet expectations in minimizing weight/volume, reduce life cycle cost, absorb and dissipate kinetic energy of landing impact, various requirements of strength, stability, stiffness, ground clearance, and furthermore, control and brake, wheel and steering system mechanical synergy. These requirements are overseen and regulated by the FAA to ensure the proper operations and safety of all aircraft hardware and design.


Read more »


The right ground power unit (GPU) can be life-saver for any aviation business, saving a significant amount of both time and money. This makes it critical to invest in a high-quality GPU and maintenance program. GPUs are used as auxiliary power supplies when an aircraft is grounded. Running an aircraft engine while it is stationary and grounded is a waste of fuel and money, so GPUs are important resource-saving tools.


Read more »


Due to the demands and stresses they operate under, fasteners used in the aerospace industry must be manufactured under incredibly strict high-quality and high-precision design and manufacturing standards. The aerospace industry uses a wide variety of fasteners, such as screws, rivets, nuts, bolts, pins, and collars.


Read more »


When it comes to aircraft maintenance and overhauls, one of the most intricate procedures is engine replacement. It can also be one of the most expensive, especially if something goes wrong during the overhaul itself, or afterwards during operations. Therefore, here are some key things to keep in mind if you’re considering an engine replacement.


Read more »


Stan Lee, may he rest in peace, helped create the icon that is X-Men’s Magneto. The fictional character, created in 1963, shares the name of a magneto component, which has been in operation since 1903— suggesting that he may have based the character on this powerful electrical generator. Both Magnetos utilize the basic functioning principles of a magnetic field— let’s take a look at how a magneto component is put to work in aviation. Generally speaking, ignition systems need to generate high voltage in a small window of time, we’re talking around 20,000 volts in an instant.


Read more »


Recent Twitter Posts

Semiconductor's Certifications and Memberships

We’re Glad You Visited Us Today.

Remember Us Next Time If You are Looking for Any Types of Aviation Parts.

Request for Quote